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Teesdale 2017-177

Equality and diversity

We welcome our duties under the Equality Act 2010 to eliminate discrimination, advance equality of opportunity and foster good relations in relation to age (as appropriate), disability, ethnicity, gender (including issues of transgender, and of maternity and pregnancy), religion and belief, and sexual identity. We welcome our duty under the Education and Inspections Act 2006 to promote community cohesion. We recognise that these duties reflect international human rights standards as expressed in the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, the UN Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities, and the Human Rights Act 1998.

In fulfilling the legal obligations cited above, we are guided by the following principles:

Principle 1: All learners are of equal value

We see all learners and potential learners, and their parents and carers, as of equal value regardless of whether or not they have a disability, whatever their ethnicity, culture, national origin or national status, whatevertheir gender and gender identity, whatever their religious or non-religious affiliation or faith background, whatever their sexual identity.

Principle 2: We recognise and respect difference

Treating people equally (Principle 1 above) does not necessarily involve treating them all the same. Our policies, procedures and activities must not discriminate but must nevertheless take account of differences of life-experience, outlook and background, and in the kinds of barrier and disadvantage which people may face, in relation to: disability, so that reasonable adjustments are made; ethnicity, so that different cultural backgrounds and experiences of prejudice are recognised; gender, so that the different needs and experiences of girls and boys, and women and men, are recognised; religion, belief or faith backgrounds and sexual identity.

Principle 3: We foster positive attitudes and relationships, and a shared sense of cohesion and belonging

We intend that our policies, procedures and activities should promote: positive attitudes towards people with a disability; good relations between people with and without a disability; an absence of harassment of people with a disability; positive interaction, good relations and dialogue between groups and communities different from each other in terms of ethnicity, culture, religious affiliation, national origin or national status, and an absence of prejudice-related bullying and incidents; mutual respect and good relations between boys and girls, women and men, and an absence of sexual and homophobic harassment.

Principle 4: We observe good equalities practice in staff recruitment, retention and development

We ensure that policies and procedures should benefit all employees and potential employees, for example in recruitment and promotion, and in continuing professional development: whether or not they have a disability; whatever their ethnicity, culture, religious affiliation, national origin or national status; whatever their gender and sexual identity, and with full respect for legal rights relating to pregnancy and maternity.

Principle 5: We aim to reduce and remove inequalities and barriers that already exist

In addition to avoiding or minimising possible negative impacts of our policies, we take opportunities to maximise positive impacts by reducing and removing inequalities and barriers that may already exist between: people with and without a disability; people of different ethnic, cultural and religious backgrounds and girls and boys, women and men.

Principle 6: We consult and involve widely

We engage with a range of groups and individuals to ensure that those who are affected by a policy or activity are consulted and involved in the design of new policies, and in the review of existing ones. We consult and involve: people with and without a disability; people from a range of ethnic, cultural and religious backgrounds; both women and men, girls and boys and people of any sexual orientation.

Principle 7: Society as a whole should benefit

We intend that our policies and activities should benefit society as a whole, both locally and nationally, by fostering greater social cohesion, and greater participation in public life of: people with and without a disability; people of a wide range of ethnic, cultural and religious backgrounds; both women and men, girls and boys and people of any sexual orientation.

Principle 8: We base our practices on sound evidence

We maintain and publish quantitative and qualitative information showing our compliance with the public sector equality duty (PSED) set out in clause 149 of the Equality Act 2010.

Principle 9: Objectives

We formulate and publish specific and measurable objectives, based on the evidence we have collected and published (principle 8) and the engagement in which we have been involved (principle 7). The objectives which we identify take into account national and local priorities and issues, as appropriate. We keep our equality objectives under review and report annually on progress towards achieving them. Addressing prejudice and prejudice-related bullying the school is opposed to all forms of prejudice which stand in the way of fulfilling the legal duties: prejudices around disability and special educational needs; prejudices around racism and xenophobia, including those that are directed towards religious groups and communities, for example antisemitism and Islamophobia and those that are directed against travellers, migrants, refugees and people seeking asylum and prejudices reflecting sexism and homophobia.

Our equality objectives

Action

Timescale

Review of impact

Develop an accessible, safe outdoor area that will develop pupils’ social and inter-personal skills and provide for their physical development through sports. The school has no suitable outdoor area and the outdoor sporting facilities are limited.

Architects and the Trust Estates Manager are planning the needed developments which include also developing access to the school, improving site safety and security.

The planned structure will provide rich opportunities for pupils to learn to interact constructively and harmoniously with their peers, respecting differences between different pupils regarding disability and special educational needs, age and gender.

Summer 2019

School planning has not given focus to the needs of pupils nor especially of pupils with disabilities.

Pupils currently have little access to the outdoors during the day as there is nowhere they can go that offers any cover during inclement weather. There are few places to stand other than grassed areas.

Maintaining site security is a priority but this in turn, further restricts access pupils have, to outdoor provision.

The development of the outdoor areas will significantly enhance the experience of pupils. They will be able to develop their skills in a much-improved environment which can be effectively supervised. 

Pupils will benefit from access to outdoor areas where they could play ball games in all weather. Pupils with disabilities will benefit from being able to access them at any time and would be able to participate in the activities open to others.

 

All pupils at the school will undertake learning activities with other pupils within the family of schools in the trust. This will foster positive attitudes and relationships with groups of pupils across the trust, with different characteristics. It will develop a shared sense of cohesion and belonging within the family of schools.

Summer 2019

Pupils will gain a deeper understanding of their part within a large and diverse community. They will benefit from working and learning alongside pupils from widely differing economic backgrounds, ethnic backgrounds and with those from cities and different rural areas.